Agree:

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Barack Obama Former President of United States of America

For too many of us, it’s become safer to retreat into our own bubbles, whether in our neighborhoods or college campuses or places of worship or our social media feeds, surrounded by people who look like us and share the same political outlook and never challenge our assumptions. The rise of naked partisanship, increasing economic and regional stratification, the splintering of our media into a cha... See More
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Tim Berners-Lee Inventor of the World Wide Web

The system is failing. The way ad revenue works with clickbait is not fulfilling the goal of helping humanity promote truth and democracy. So I am concerned.
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Jonathan Zittrain Internet Law Professor at Harvard Law School

A social-media or search company looking to take the next step and attempt to create a favorable outcome in an election would certainly have the means. While a propagandistic Google doodle or similarly ideological alteration to a common home page lies in plain view, newsfeeds and search results have no baseline. They can be subtly tweaked without hazarding the same backlash.
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The Economist Weekly magazine-format newspaper

Facebook, Google and Twitter were supposed to save politics as good information drove out prejudice and falsehood. Something has gone very wrong
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Freedom House NGO dedicated to the expansion of freedom around the world

Online manipulation and disinformation tactics played an important role in elections in at least 18 countries over the past year, including the United States. [...] The effects of these rapidly spreading techniques on democracy and civic activism are potentially devastating. The fabrication of grassroots support for government policies on social media creates a closed loop in which the regime esse... See More
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Jason Tanz Site director at Wired

Facebook built its vision of democracy on bad maths. [...] Facebook proved, thrillingly, that an algorithm can be a better judge of what someone wants to read than any human ever could. But that's not always a good thing. People tend to read, like, and share information that confirms their own biases, or stokes their anger—not necessarily information that brings them closer to citizens of all poli... See More
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Dan Nadir Vice President of Digital Risk at Proofpoint

People rely on social media platforms to communicate with each other, conduct business and form opinions, but the Internet wasn't designed with trust in mind.
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Vyacheslav Polonski Network scientist, University of Oxford

The biggest threat to democracy? Your social media feed. Instead of creating a digitally-mediated agora which encourages broad discussion, the internet has increased ideological segregation. It filters dissent out of our feeds and grants a disproportionate amount of clout to the most extreme opinions due to their greater visibility and accelerated viral cycles.
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Alexis C. Madrigal Writer at The Atlantic

Facebook’s draw is its ability to give you what you want. Like a page, get more of that page’s posts; like a story, get more stories like that; interact with a person, get more of their updates. From the system’s perspective, success is correctly predicting what you’ll like, comment on, or share. But as far as “personalized newspapers” go, this one’s editorial sensibilities are limited. Most peopl... See More
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Omidyar Network Philanthropic investment firm founded by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar

It is becoming increasingly apparent that fundamental principles underlying democracy—trust, informed dialogue, a shared sense of reality, mutual consent, and participation—are being put to the test by certain features and attributes of social media, [especially as] technology companies increasingly achieve financial success by monetizing public attention.
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Michael Clemens Senior fellow at the Center for Global Development (CGD), a Washington D.C.-based think tank

We wanted democracy, but we got mobocracy
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Charlie Beckett Media Professor at London School of Economics, founding director of think tank POLIS

That the Internet is innately democratic and that it will have revolutionary political consequences [is] a straw man
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Stevan Dojcinovic Editor in chief of KRIK, independent Serbian news website

By picking small countries with shaky democratic institutions to be experimental subjects, Facebook is showing a cynical lack of concern for how its decisions affect the most vulnerable. Facebook could be a tool for such alternative spaces to thrive. Instead — at least in Serbia — it risks becoming just another playground for the powerful
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Kaitlyn Buss Editorial writer at The Detroit News

Shouting online doesn’t save democracy. It threatens it by degrading some of the most necessary foundations for self-government: local engagement and strong relationships with family, friends and community.

Disagree:

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Mark Zuckerberg CEO at Facebook

We'll keep working to ensure the integrity of free and fair elections around the world, and to ensure our community is a platform for all ideas and force for good in democracy. The data we have has always shown that our broader impact -- from giving people a voice to enabling candidates to communicate directly to helping millions of people vote -- played a far bigger role in this election [than mi... See More
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Bill Gates Philanthropist. Founder and former CEO of Microsoft.

I felt sure that allowing anyone to publish information and making it easy to find would enhance democracy and the overall quality of political debate. However, the partitioning you talk about which started on cable TV and might be even stronger in the digital world is a concern. We all need to think about how to avoid this problem. It would seem strange to have to force people to look at ideas th... See More
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Alec Ross Former Senior Innovation Advisor to Hillary Clinton, currently running for Governor of Marylan

The information control that some of the world’s strongmen and terrorist groups have on people is tenuous. The digital world is still relatively new, and for the most part, when young people come to more power, we will have more open societies. If you look at this over decades, I think it will be very positive globally
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Madeleine Albright US Secretary of State (Bill Clinton)

There have always been new ways of communication to contend with (for example the cassette recordings of Polish solidarity leader Lech Walesa’s speeches that were spread from factory to factory). So technology can very much be democratizing. The question is how we can use technology to increase the democratizing governance aspect instead of dealing with the fact that people often have the wrong in... See More
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Richard Stengel US Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

With people communicating horizontally, the trend line toward increasing freedom and democracy is there
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Sam Greene Director of the Russia Institute, King’s College London

Our politics are vulnerable to nefarious influences — whether of the Kremlin variety or the Breitbart variety — not because our information landscape is open and fluid, but because voters’ perceptions have become untethered from reality. For reasons that are both complex and debatable, very many voters have stopped seeing government as a tool for the production of the common good, and have instead... See More
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